Body Image

We live in a world with stick thin models and celebrities.  We see flawless men and women on the front of magazines, which are filled with articles like “How to get rock hard abs for summer,” or “How to lose 10 pounds in a week.”  Television ads even promote the greatness of diet pills.  The constant reminder of being skinny is all around us.  Young girls and women have little chance of escaping messages that promote a negative body image.  What most women don’t realize is that none of this is “real.”

The average woman has a 7 percent chance that she will be as slim as a catwalk model and a 1 percent chance of being as thin as a supermodel, according to Web site healthyplace.com. An assistant professor of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School, Paul Hamburg, writes that the advertising industry reproduces “ideals that are absurdly out of line with what real bodies really do look like…the market perpetuates a market for frustration and disappointment. Its customers will never disappear.”  Below is a video that proves just that.

As you can see from the video, women are being transformed into something different from who they truly are.  Most, if not all, the women we see in magazines, on billboards, and even on TV and movies are being portrayed as something they are not.  Without this knowledge, women are beginning to feel self-conscious and uncomfortable in their own skin.  Young women are extremely vulnerable to developing eating disorders—millions are suffering from illnesses like anorexia or bulimia, and their mission for the thinnest bodies are only furthered by ads with 90-pound models.

These woman are visibly unhealthy and have taken “skinny” to a whole new level.

There needs to be direct action taken by the advertising industry to show women that being too thin is dangerous for individuals and for society as a whole.  Because this is a billion-dollar industry, change would most likely be a long time in coming. But it is a necessary change that our culture needs to go through…women’s lives are at stake.

http://www.suite101.com/content/body-image-in-advertising-a80175

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7 Comments

Filed under Body Image

7 responses to “Body Image

  1. This doesn’t have to deal with advertising, although it should, but i am pretty sure that runway models have to have a certain weight limit in order to participate. Which i think is a great step to reduce eating disorders, or at least help reduce them. But i do think that it should also be considered for advertising too, because it is a very dangerous image for women to see that and then create those negative thoughts that could lead to a very damaging lifestyle.

  2. These models are crazy! I am a lover of the show “Americas Next Top Model.” One thing that I love about it is that Tyra Banks is a firm believer in a healthy body. Last season she even kicked a girl off because she was too skinny in order to let young girls know it’s important to have a healthy body.

  3. Ahh we watched that photo shop video in one of my classes last semester, and the difference makes you shake your head in disgust. Why is it acceptable to manipulate images like that? Why has this completely unreal version of the body become the ultimate idol? It’s so sad! And almost worse is the editor’s commentary…if I remember correctly, he keeps referring to skin folds or whatever as “problem areas” or something…great job, bud, totally fueling the issue at hand! The media is chasing a body image goal that cannot me met. Because it does not exist!

  4. In a class of mine we watched this video and then talked about how most celebrities won’t agree to be featured in magazines unless some photoshop work is done. This really disappointed me.

  5. That video was crazy, good work on the post!

  6. Pingback: A Brief Description of Anorexia « The Fashion Industry Partly Causes Anorexia

  7. Pingback: Works Cited Page. « The Fashion Industry Partly Causes Anorexia

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